Recent Updates

Slim and Monte

Mr. Monte Tish came to Kuna with Slim the golden eagle last Tuesday and was a hit as always. The students were amazed at the size of Slim and the fact that when Slim was rescued they all thought she was a male because of how small she was. We also had a big treat the day before Monte and Slim came to see us. We were taking a walk around the school counting birds and there right in front us was a Cooper's Hawk sitting on the ground. We also saw Marilyn the Merlin last week. This is the fourth year in a row that she has come to spend the winter in Kuna. 

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Archimedes, the Great Horned Owl

On December 14, Ms. Corrine, from the BLM, brought Archimedes, the Great Horned Owl, to our classroom.  It was so amazing to see such a beautiful, often camoflaged, bird so close up.  We noticed right away that he was missing an eye and Ms. Corrine told us it was because he had been hit by a car.  He has beautiful feathers and we learned that the long feathers that we've often thought of as "ear tufts" are actually called plumicorns!  It's our vocab word this week, we liked it so much!  Ms. Corrine talked to us about how owls are raptors or birds of prey and that they have a lot of special...

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Billions of Quail at our Feeder

  On December 13, 2017 I was looking at our bird feeders and guess what I saw? I saw about 50 quails trying to force themselves into the center of all the quail to get some of our ground feed. It was an amazing sight. I was so excited to see the quails. I love quails, so I threw some ground feed into our garden and quickly shut the door so that  I wouldn’t scare them.  Then moments later more than half the quail were in the garden right in front of me. I was so happy I had a perfect view to take a picture.  So I took my iPad and took a picture. I hope you enjoy looking at the picture of...

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Mrs.Urban's Visit

Hi, this is Grace, Paige and Jane. On December 11th, we had a visit from Mrs. Urban. She presented how birds survive in the winter. One thing that keeps the birds warm is that all birds are endothermic, which means they maintain their tempature internally. Another way that most birds keep themself warm is puff up their feathers and then put one leg up to their feathers. Some people get alarmed when they see these "one legged birds". Another time when people get alarmed is when they see 10 legs instead of two! This happens because little babies want to get in their mom's fluff of the...

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Lots of birds on 12/12

5 white crowned sparrows. 55 quail. 20 house finches. Tons of birds on 12/12.

November and Early December Observations

Council high students spent a couple of days observing bids at the feeder and on the Weiser River Trail in November. However, due to weather and observing late in the  afternoon, few birds were seen. The first observation in December was more productive. Students observed several species: American goldfinch, black-capped chickadees, house sparrows, northern flicker, and a rough-legged hawk!

Idaho Native Plants

Today our class got to plant native seeds in trays for planting in the Fall. We were joined by Sean Finn of the Golden Eagle Audubon Society and Kristin Gnojewski. They brought Showy Goldeneye, Yellow Beeplant, Munro's Globemallow, Rabbit Brush,  and Antelope Bitterbrush seeds. Everyone had the opportunity to plant and then we set the trays outside our classroom. We had to protect them from the birds and the squirrles, so Sean wrapped the trays in chicken wire. We will be watching for new growth in the Spring. Next school year, 4th graders will plant these at the Warm Springs Park that is... Read more

House Finch

We went bird watching outside of TJCS and saw 24 House Finch's. The weather was in and the thirties and it was overcast. The bird's were in the tree's and on the feeder's. Overall I think it really fun watching the birds and seeing their behavior.

Heidi talks raptors

This week BSU ornithologist came to TVCS 6th grades to teach how to identify raptor species that we think we are seeing near school.  She taught us about Accipiters, Buteos, and Falcons.  Fastest fliers, the falcons, flap and catch prey on the wing.  They have long pointed wings that reach nearly to end of the tail.  Their wings are not designed for soaring, but fast flapping.  Buteos have broad shorter wings with finger feathers that are designed for soaring and looking down on the ground to pounce upon small rodents and grasshoppers.  The accipiters a fast and are masters of sharp turns...

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Birdfeeders + bugs = cool science!

So a couple weeks ago, I finally took down the hummingbird feeder from the outdoor classroom. Inside was a big clump of bugs that had crawled in the feeder holes trying to get the sugar water. After locating the ever-elusive dissecting microscopes that Trail Wind owns, I put a couple of the ants under the scopes and let the kids check them out. They were fascinated! Some students noticed that there were also a couple of bees in the bug clump. The next day, we had bees under the microscopes. We could see compound eyes, stingers, wing patterns, and spiky "hairs on the bees' bodies. Pretty...

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